Indigenous Peoples’ Rights: from local identities to the global Indigenous movement

Columbia University

CSER W4482 Indigenous Peoples’ Rights: from local identities to the global Indigenous movement

(short title: Indigenous Peoples: Movement and Rights)

                                                Fall Semester 2015

Elsa Stamatopoulou                                                                            es3054@columbia.edu

Monday and Wednesday 4:10pm-5:25pm                                         (212)851-2381

Location: Schermerhorn 652

Office hours: Wednesday 3:00-4:00pm 618 Kent Hall

Columbia University is dedicated to facilitating equal access for students with disabilities and to cultivating a campus culture that is sensitive and responsive to the needs of students.  Please let me know, either through the Office of Disability Services, or by contacting me individually, if you need special accommodations because of a disability.

COURSE OVERVIEW

Rationale

The main task of the course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous Peoples’ movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global Indigenous identity. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course will analyze the interaction between the Indigenous movement-one of the strongest social movements of our times- and the intergovernmental system over the past 50 years paying special attention to its questioning of and impact on international norms, institutions and major global debates. The course will be situated at the intersection of human rights studies, political science, Indigenous studies, ethnic studies, international law, development studies, sociology and anthropology. Gender issues are integrated in the course.

Course description

Indigenous Peoples, numbering more that 370 million in some 90 countries and about 5000 groups and representing a great part of the world’s human diversity and cultural heritage, continue to raise major controversies and to face threats to their physical and cultural existence. The main task of this interdisciplinary course is to explore the complex historic circumstances and political actions that gave rise to the international Indigenous movement through the human rights agenda and thus also produced a global Indigenous identity on all continents, two intertwined and deeply significant phenomena over the past fifty years.  We will analyze the achievements, challenges and potential of the dynamic interface between the Indigenous Peoples’ movement-one of the strongest social movements of our times- and the international community, especially the United Nations system. Centered on the themes laid out in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007), the course will examine how Indigenous Peoples have been contesting and reshaping norms, institutions and global debates in the past 50 years, re-shaping and gradually decolonizing international institutions and how they have contributed to some of the most important contemporary debates, including human rights, development,  law, and specifically the concepts of self-determination, governance, group rights, inter-culturality and pluriculturality, gender, land, territories and natural resources, cultural rights, intellectual property, health, education, the environment and climate justice.

At the same time, many significant areas remain open to vigorous debate. Who are the Indigenous Peoples? What are the policies and practices that continue to threaten many Indigenous Peoples with genocide or ethnocide today? Indigenous Peoples’ claims for retributive justice are leading to debates over restitution, and the legal, political and moral consequences of the acknowledgement of past wrongs. What are the ramifications of the right to self-determination for Indigenous Peoples in a contemporary world? Collective and individual identities and human rights may be in tension with each other. How are these to be reconciled? Gender and generational differentiations may underscore not just individual rifts, but potentially broader conflict within groups themselves. What could be a human rights response to such conflicts? Economic interests of majorities are put forward to justify displacement, dispossession and other violations of Indigenous Peoples’ rights. And the hunger for the world’s still unexplored natural resources that reside on Indigenous Peoples’ lands motivate major decisions of governments and the private sector, with unclear commitment to benefit sharing and even the human rights of Indigenous Peoples.  How are conflicting claims and rights between Indigenous Peoples and the dominant society to be resolved? What should be the role of the State in these conflicts?

The syllabus will draw on a variety of academic literature, case studies and documentation of Indigenous organizations, the UN and other intergovernmental organizations as well as States from different parts of the world. Students will also have the opportunity to interface with Indigenous leaders and representatives of international organizations and States and will be encouraged to attend the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Select short films will be shown and discussed in class.

This course is open to advanced level undergraduates as well as graduate students.

REQUIREMENTS

Students will be expected to prepare one 8-10 page paper (12-15 pages for graduate students) at the end of the semester (50% of the grade), write 1-2 pages weekly on class readings (25% of the grade) and participate in class, including through a class presentation (25% of the grade). The final paper, due by December 21st, should be either a research paper on a subject related to thematic material in the course or a critical review of a text discussed in the course. Students are expected to read assigned material in advance of each class and have substantive comments, questions and critiques of the material for discussion. Please note that class attendance is required for substantive learning in this course.

 

TOPICS AND READINGS

The course is organized around five broad areas: PART I How Indigenous Peoples found an international voice; PART II How Indigenous Peoples are reshaping international institutions and agendas; PART III  25 years of struggle: the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 2007; PART IV Indigenizing international debates; PART V The return of the international to the local.  Detailed topics are indicated below under each class.

Reading material will be posted and can be downloaded from Courseworks (www.courseworks.columbia.edu), except for readings for which URL links are provided in the syllabus; those readings can be accessed by clicking on those links from the syllabus page of Courseworks. Library copies are on reserve at the Butler Library Reserve Desk.

Students should also familiarize themselves with the websites of Indigenous Peoples’ organizations, including: AIPP (Asia Indigenous Peoples’ Pact), www.aippnet.org; Amazon Alliance, www.amazonalliance.org; Assembly of First Nations, www.afn.ca; FIMI ( The International Indigenous Women’s Forum), www.fimi-iiwf.org; ICC (Inuit Circumpolar Council), www.inuit.org; IITC (International Indian Treaty Council), www.treatycouncil.org; IPACC (Indigenous Peoples of Africa Co-ordinating Committee), www.ipacc.org.za/eng; Sami Council, www.samicouncil.net, RAIPON (Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North), www.raipon.info; Indigenous Peoples' Global Partnership on Climate Change and Forests, www.indigenousclimate.org; Tebtebba Foundation, www.tebtebba.org.

 

(28 sessions; readings preceded by an asterisk will be viewed as resources for the class)

Session 1, September 9th

-Introduction (Opening lecture on “Τhe Indigenous Emergency”) and course overview

            United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples http://undesadspd.org/IndigenousPeoples/DeclarationontheRightsofIndigenousPeoples.aspx

 

International Labour Organisation (ILO) Conventions No. 107 and 169, http://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO:12100:P12100_ILO_CODE:C169

Peruse websites of the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (SPFII) and of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, www.un.org/indigenous and www.ohchr.org

 

PART I           HOW INDIGENOUS PEOPLES FOUND AN INTERNATIONAL VOICE

Session 2, September 14th

-Origins of the international Indigenous movement and the articulation of rights

-State of the human rights debates during the formative years: decolonization, non-governmental organizations and the beginnings of international mechanisms for the protection and monitoring of human rights

-Combating gross and systematic human rights violations and discrimination against Indigenous Peoples:  a study and a methodology that supported the Indigenous movement

-The first international institutional responses: research, ILO Convention No. 107 and the Working Group on Indigenous Populations

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs,  State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples (SOWIP), New York, 2009, ST/ESA/328, Sales No. 09.VI.13, Introductory chapter, http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/SOWIP_web.pdf

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, 2014, Beacon Press, Boston, pp. xi-14, 25-31, 169-172

Elsa Stamatopoulou, “Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations: Human Rights as a Developing Dynamic”, in Human Rights Quarterly, pp. 58-81, vol. 16, No. 1 Feb. 1994, The Johns Hopkins University Press

Courtney Jung, The Moral Force of Indigenous Politics: Critical Liberalism and the Zapatistas, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2008, pp 147-182

Steven T. Newcomb, Pagans in the Promised Land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery, Golden, Colorado, Fulcrum Publishing, 2008 pp ix-xxxiii, 73-102

Session 3, September 16th

-Who are the Indigenous Peoples? The concepts of “peoples”, “minorities”, “indigenous peoples”: struggles and normative frameworks

-Exceptional circumstances requiring exceptional procedures for the participation of indigenous peoples in international human rights debates

Paper of the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues on the international concept of Indigenous Peoples, UN doc. PFII/2004/WS.1/3 (posted on Courseworks)

Augusto Willemsen Dias, «How Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Reached the UN” in Claire Charters and Rodolfo Stavenhagen, eds., Making the Declaration Work: The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Copenhagen, International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA), 2010, 16-31

            S. James Anaya, Indigenous Peoples in International Law, second edition, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2004, pp97-128

            Roberto Mucaro Borrero, “Rethinking Taino: A Taino Perspective”, in Taino Revival: Critical Perspectives on Puerto Rican Identity and Cultural Politics, pp. 139-160, edited by Gabriel Haslip-Viera, Princeton, Markus Wiener Publishers

Kay Warren, Indigenous Movements and Their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1998, pp 3-22, 33-51

 

PART II            HOW INDIGENOUS PEOPLES ARE RESHAPING INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AND AGENDAS

Session 4, September 21st

-International Funds for Indigenous Peoples

-ILO Convention No. 169 and ILO monitoring mechanisms

-International Year of the World’s Indigenous People

-International Decades of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

-World Conference on Indigenous Peoples 2014

            Outcome Document of the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, UN doc. A/69/L.1, http://www.un.org/en/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/69/L.1&referer=http://www.un.org/en/ga/69/meetings/indigenous/&Lang=E

Final report on the Second International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, UN doc. A/69/271, http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A%2F69%2F271&Submit=Search&Lang=E

Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations, Vol. I, film produced by SPFII, www.un.org//esa/socdev/unpfii/en/multimedia.html  (see right bottom of page)

International Labour Organisation (ILO) Conventions No. 107 and 169,    http://www.ilo.org/indigenous/Conventions/no107/lang--en/index.htm

and

http://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO:12100:P12100_ILO_CODE:C169

S. James Anaya (see above), pp 217-247

Session 5, September 23rd

-Drafting processes of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP): from the Working Group on Indigenous Populations to the Commission on Human Rights, the Human Rights Council, the UNPFII and the General Assembly: negotiating a seminal document

            John Henriksen, “The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Some Key Issues and Events in the Process” in Making the Declaration Work  pp78-84

            Andrea Carmen, International Indian Treaty Council Report from the Battle Field-the Struggle for the Declaration” in Making the Declaration Work pp 86-95

            Albert  Barume, “Responding to the Concerns of the African States” in Making the Declaration Work pp 170-182

* Erica-Irene Daes, “The Contribution of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations to the Genesis and the Adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” in Making the Declaration Work (see above)  pp 48-76

 

 

Session 6, September 28th

-Monitoring the obligation of states to respect and fulfill Indigenous Peoples’ rights : Special Rapporteur on the human rights and fundamental freedoms of  Indigenous Peoples  and  other international human rights mechanisms

            Case of Lovelace v. Canada, Decision of the Human Rights Committee, UN doc. A/36/40, Annex 7G (1988), http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/undocs/session36/6-24.htm. In connection with this case, please read also Audra Simpson, Mohawk Interruptus (Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States, 2014, Duke University Press, Durham and London, pp. 56-65.

Case of Kitok v. Sweden, Decision of the Human Rights Committee, UN doc. A/43/40, Annex 7G(1998), www.bayefsky.com/pdf/104_sweden197_1985.pdf

Committee on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD), General Recommendation XXIII on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UN doc. A/52/18(1997)122, www.bayefsky.com/themes/indigenous_general-comments.pdf

Peruse website of the Special Rapporteur of the Human Rights Council on the rights of Indigenous peoples, http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/IPeoples/SRIndigenousPeoples/Pages/SRIPeoplesIndex.aspx

, read about the mandate and one or two of the Rapporteur’s reports on a country or a theme of your choice.

 

Session 7, September 30th

-The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII): specialized international policy-making with Indigenous Peoples

            Peruse the website of the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, including “about us”, “our work”, “resources”, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii

            Report of the eighth session of the UNPFII, UN doc. E/2009/43 Annex, www.un.org/indigenous

            Tonya Gonnella Frichner , Impact on Indigenous Peoples of the International Legal construct known as the Doctrine of Discovery, which has served as the Foundation of the Violation of their Human Rights, UN doc. E/C.19/2010/13, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/E.C.19.2010.13%20EN.pdf

Elsa Stamatopoulou, “The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues”, in International Human Rights Monitoring Mechanisms: Essays in Honour of Jacob Th. Moller, 2009, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers/Kluwer Law International

 

Session 8, October 5th

-Climate justice and Indigenous Peoples

            UNPFII seventh session report, UN doc. E/2008/43, paras. 4-9

Paimaneh Hastaie and Hassan Id Balkassm, Study on the Extent to which Climate Change Policies and Projects Adhere to the Standards set forth in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UN doc. E/C.19/2010/7, http://undesadspd.org/IndigenousPeoples/UNPFIISessions/Ninth.aspx

Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, The Copenhagen Results of the UNFCCC Implications for Indigenous peoples’ Local Adaptation and Mitigation Measures, UN doc. E/C.19/2010/18, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/E.C.19.2010.18EN.pdf

Lars Anders Baer, Study on the impact of climate change adaptation and mitigation measures   on reindeer herding, UN doc E/C.19/2010/15, (report at the Ninth Session of the UNPFII placed on CourseWorks)

 

Session 9, October 7th

-Regional systems and Indigenous Peoples’ rights: The Americas and Africa

            Bartolome Clavero, “Cultural Supremacy, Domestic Constitutions, and the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples” in Making the Declaration Work (see above), pp344-350

            Albert Kwokwo Barume, Land Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Africa, Copenhagen, International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs, 2010, pp 20-60

Laura A. Young and Abraham Korrir Sing’Oei, “Access to Justice for Indigenous Peoples in Africa” in Wilton Littlechild and Elsa Stamatopoulou eds. Indigenous Peoples’ Access to Justice, Including Truth and Reconciliation Processes , Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University, 2014, pp. 89-112

S. James Anaya (see above), pp232-247, 266-288,

 

 

Session 10, October 12th

-The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP): the role of research in Indigenous affairs.  Indigenous research guidelines: what Indigenous Peoples expect from academia

Audra Simpson, Mohawk Interruptus (Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States, 2014, Duke University Press, Durham and London, pp. 1-35

Elsa Stamatopoulou, “The Role of Research and Academia In Indigenous Peoples’ Issues: Interculturality in the Making” in Unsettling Discources: the Theory and Practice of Indigenous Studies, Porceedings of the 2013 International Seminar-Workshop on Indigenous Studies, Cordillera Studies Center, University of the Philippines-Baguio City, pp. 249-272

E/C.19/2013/17 Study on how the knowledge, history and contemporary social circumstances of indigenous peoples are embedded in the curricula of education systems, www.un.org/indigenous (see under documents of the 12th session of the UNPFII)

Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples Second Edition, 2012, Zed Books, London & New York, pp. 127-142

            Bartolome Clavero, Genocide or Ethnocide, 1933-2007: how to make, unmake and remake law through words, Milano, Giuffre Editore, 2008, pp 214-244

*Tebtebba Foundation, Indigenous Peoples; Self-Determined Development: Towards and Alternative Development Paradigm, Baguio City, 2010, pp433-446, 493-512

 

PART III           25 YEARS OF STRUGGLE: THE UN DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF   INDIGENOUS PEOPLES 2007

Session 11 and Session 12, October 14th and October 19th

-Right of Indigenous Peoples to self-determination: decolonization and survival

   *state of the concept in international law and international relations

  *the struggle and meaning for the term “peoples”

 * self-identification: legal, political and moral significance

 *aspects of the right to self-determination of Indigenous Peoples:  political, economic, social, cultural

 *the historic and contemporary significance of treaties between Indigenous Peoples and States

            S. James Anaya, “The Right of Indigenous Peoples to Self-Determination in the Post-Declaration Era” in Making the Declaration (see above), pp184-198

            Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD), General Comment 21, Right to self-determination, 1996, www.ohchr.org,  (click on Committee on “all human rights bodies” at the top, then see Treaty-based bodies, then click on Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CERD), then click on General Comments on the left and find General Comment 21)

            Robert Coulter, “The International Law of Self-Determination and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”, 15 UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs, 1 (2010)

            Dalee Sambo Dorough, “Indigenous peoples’ Right to Self-determination and Other Rights Related to Access to Justice”, in  Wilton Littlechild and Elsa Stamatopoulou eds. Indigenous Peoples’ Access to Justice, Including Truth and Reconciliation Processes , Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University, 2014 pp3-19

            Sarah Maddison, Black Politics: Inside the Complexity of Aboriginal Political Culture, 2009, Allen & Unwin, New South Wales, Australia, pp. 44-61

Hurst Hannum, Autonomy, Sovereignty and Self-Determination: the Accomodation of Conflicting Rights, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992 , pp 74-103

Miguel Alfonso Martinez, Study on treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements between States and indigenous populations, UN doc. E/CN.4/Sub.2/1999/20 [document posted on Courseworks]

 

Session 13, October 21st

-The right to lands, territories and resources: urgency and political controversy

*significance of this right for the survival of Indigenous Peoples

 *collective ownership

*displacement, empoverishment and conflict

 *restitution and compensation

            UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Report of the sixth session, UN doc . E/2007/43, paras. 4-38 (see website of SPFII, www.un.org/indigenous)

A.K. Barume, Making the Declaration Work (see above) pp 132-150, 163-173

               Alexandra Xanthaki, Indigenous Rights and United Nations Standards: Self-determination, Culture and Land, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2007, pp 237-279

            Mattias Ahren , “The Provisions on Lands, Territories and Natural Resources in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, An Introduction” in Making the Declaration Work, (see above)   pp200-215

*Elizabeth A. Povinelli, “Source The State of Shame: Australian Multiculturalism and the Crisis of Indigenous Citizenship”: Critical Inquiry, Vol. 24, No. 2, Intimacy (Winter, 1998), pp. 575-610 Published by: The University of Chicago PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1344180

.

Session 14 , October 26th

-The cultural rights of Indigenous Peoples

 *the right to a way of life and complementarity with other rights

 *language rights

 *protection of indigenous traditional knowledge

Elsa Stamatopoulou, “Taking Cultural Rights Seriously: The Vision of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples”, in The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, 2011, Stephen Allen and Alexandra Xanthaki eds., Hart Publishing Ltd., Oxford and Portland, Oregon, pp 387-412.

            State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples (see above), Chapters II and IV

            Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Linguistic Genocide in Education-or Worldwide Diversity and Human Rights?, Mahwah, New Jersey/London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers, 2000, pp v-xiii, 651-668

            Elazar Barkan, The Guilt of Nations: Restitution and Negotiating Historical Injustices, Baltimore and London, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000, pp 204-215

            S. Rama Rao, “ The Relationship between Intellectual Property and the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions”, in Ulia Popova-Gosart ed., Traditional Knowledge and Indigenous Peoples, L’auravetl’an Information and Education Network of Indigenous Peoples/World Intellectual Property Organization, WIPO Publication, Geneva, 2009 , pp 40-54

*Elsa Stamatopoulou, Cultural Rights in International Law , Leiden, Boston, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2007, pp163-229

 

Session 15, October 28th

-The cultural rights of indigenous peoples (continued)

 

Session 16, November 2nd

-The right to exist

-Non-discrimination

-Individual and collective human rights

            Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (see website of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, www.ohchr.org, click on “human rights instruments on bottom right, then click on “universal human rights instruments” on bottom right, scroll down to “war crimes and crimes against humanity” and you will find the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide)

            S. James Anaya (see above), pp129-184

            Elsa Stamatopoulou, Cultural Rights in International Law: Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Beyond, Leiden/Boston, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2007, pp 11-16

Bennet Collins, Siobhan McEvoy-levy and Alison Watson, ”The Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission: Perceptions and Understandings”, in   Wilton Littlechild and Elsa Stamatopoulou eds. Indigenous Peoples’ Access to Justice, Including Truth and Reconciliation Processes , Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University, 2014 pp. 140-169

             Will Kymlicka,  Multicultural Citizenship, Oxford,  Clarendon Press,1995, pp 34-48

            * Valmaine Toki, “Indigenous Children and Youth: The Case of Marae Courts in Aotearoa/New Zealand”, in Wilton Littlechild and Elsa Stamatopoulou eds. Indigenous Peoples’ Access to Justice, Including Truth and Reconciliation Processes , Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University, 2014, pp. 243-254

 

 

Session 17, November 4th

-Gender and the rights of indigenous women

    Twenty-year review of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and beyond: a framework to advance indigenous women’s issues (E/C.19/2015/2) prepared by the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous, Issues, http://undesadspd.org/IndigenousPeoples/CrossThematicIssues/IndigenousWomen/PublicationsonIndigenousWomen.aspx

 

        LIMA DECLARATION: ¡NOTHING ABOUT US, WITHOUT US! WORLD CONFERENCE OF INDIGENOUS WOMEN,  Progress and Challenges Regarding the Future We Want, Lima, 28-30 October 2013, http://en.mujerindigena.com/indigenous-women-of-the-world-warn-that-they-will-give-their-lives-to-defend-their-lands/

Report of the International Expert Group Meeting on Combating violence against Indigenous Women and Girls: Article 22 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, UN doc. E/C.19/2012/6, http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N12/245/82/PDF/N1224582.pdf?OpenElement

           Millan, Margara "Indigenous Women and Zapatismo: New Horizons of Visibility" In Dissident Women. Gender and Cultural Politics in Chiapas. S. Speed, R.A. Hernandez and L. Stephen Eds. University of Texas Press 2006

Paulson, Susan and Pamela Calla “Gender and Ethnicity in Bolivian Politics: Transformation or Paternalism?” Journal of Latin American Anthropology, Vol 2, No 2, 2000.

Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (see www.ohchr.org)

Case of Lovelace v. Canada (see full citation under Session 6)

Peruse website of the FIMI(The International Indigenous Women’s Forum), including the report Mairin Iwanka Raya: Indigenous Women Confront Violence, 2006, www.fimi-iiwf.org (website is in 3 languages)

* Briefing Notes on Gender and Indigenous Women, see SPFII website, http://undesadspd.org/IndigenousPeoples/CrossThematicIssues/IndigenousWomen.aspx

and  http://undesadspd.org/IndigenousPeoples/LibraryDocuments.aspx

 

PART IV   INDIGENIZING INTERNATIONAL DEBATES

Sessions 18 and 19, November 9th and November 11th

-Development and self-determination/development with culture and identity

*Indigenous Peoples’ right to development: whose “development”?

*Indicators of Indigenous peoples’ well-being, poverty and sustainability

*Indigenous peoples’ well-being and sustainability: experiences and challenges in implementing the right to free, prior and informed consent

*Indigenous Peoples and the Millennium Development Goals

*Indigenous Peoples in voluntary isolation

            State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples (see above under session 2), Chapter I

            UNPFII ninth session report, UN doc. E/2010/43, paras. 4-35

            Tebtebba Foundation, Indigenous Peoples; Self-Determined Development: Towards an Alternative Development Paradigm, Baguio City, 2010, pp 89-117, 331-431

            Jerry Mander and Victoria Tauli-Corpuz eds., Paradigm Wars: Indigenous Peoples’ Resistance to Economic Globalization, A Special Report of the International Forum on Globalization Committee on Indigenous Peoples, San Francisco, pp 9-16

            Tebtebba Foundation (Indigenous Peoples’ International Centre for Policy Research and Education), Indicators Relevant for Indigenous Peoples: A Resource Book, Baguio City, Philippines, 2008, pp 37-61, 241-293

UNPFII International Expert Meeting on free, prior and informed consent, UN doc. E/C.19/2005/3, http://daccess-ods.un.org/TMP/6299302.57797241.html

UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Report on the Regional Seminar on Indigenous peoples in isolation, initial contact in the Amazon and Gran Chaco Region, UN doc. E/C.19/2007/CRP.1, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/6session_crp1_en.doc

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP),  Asia Indigenous Peoples’Perspectives on Development, reports compiled and edited by Jannie Lasimbang, Hannah Maran, Jenifer Lasimbang, Joan Carling, Gam A. Shimray, Devasish Roy, Rukka Sombolinggi and Famark Hlawnching, Chiang Mai, pp 1-35

*Government of Ecuador, Objectivos del Milenio, Estado de Situacion 2008, Nacionalidades y Pueblos Indigenas del Ecuador, (on inter-culturality, pp. 17-26), Quito, 2009[1]

 

Session 20, November 16th

--Protecting Human Rights and Saving Life on Earth

 

Key Concepts: Biological Diversity, Bio-Cultural Heritage, Bio-Cultural protocols, Customary Law, tangible and intangible cultural heritage, (traditional) knowledge, innovations and practices, genetic resources, free, prior and informed consent, access and benefit sharing (ABS).

Convention on Biological Diversity, https://www.cbd.int/traditional/  and, for the text of the Convention  http://www.cbd.int/doc/legal/cbd-en.pdf

The Nagoya ABS Protocol,  https://www.cbd.int/cop/cop-10/doc/advance-final-unedited-texts/advance-unedited-version-ABS-Protocol-footnote-en.doc          

State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples (for link see above under session 2), chapter III

Stuart Kirsch, “Lost Worlds: Environmental Disasters, ‘Culture Loss’ and the Law”, Current Anthropology, 2001, 42

 

* Technical Brief on the Nagoya Protocol by the Union for Ethical Biotrade ( posted on Courseworks)

 (2): pp167-198.

 

Session 21, November 18th

-The role of public and private corporations in the situation of indigenous peoples: what justice?

-International financial institutions and Indigenous Peoples Rights: registering Indigenous voices?

-Promising  examples and challenges on the ground

International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) Indigenous World 2014,

http://www.iwgia.org/iwgia_files_publications_files/0671_I2014eb.pdf, pp. 560-566 (on business and human rights),

Cathal Doyle and Andrew Whitmore, Indigenous Peoples and the Extractive Sector: Towards a Rights-Respecting Engagement, Tebtebba, Piplinks and Middlesex University London, Tebtebba Foundation 2014, pp. xviii-xxxi, 17-34, 51-78

E/C.19/2013/16 Consolidated report of Special Rapporteurs of the UNPFII on extractive industries and their impact on indigenous peoples, http://daccess-ods.un.org/TMP/3332181.2748909.html

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on Extractive Industries and Indigenous Peoples, A/HRC/24/41, http://unsr.jamesanaya.org/docs/annual/2013-hrc-annual-report-en.p Victoria Tauli-Corpuz ed., Good Practices on Indigenous Peoples’ Development, Tebtebba Foundation and  Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Baguio City, Philippines, 2006, pp i-vi, 3-74

            International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Policy of Engagement with Indigenous Peoples, (posted on Courseworks)

            “The Indigenous Peoples’ Forum at IFAD” in The Indigenous World 2014, pp. 590-593, IWGIA, http://www.iwgia.org/iwgia_files_publications_files/0671_I2014eb.pdf

*Report of the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous peoples on the impact of large-scale development projects on the human rights and fundamental freedoms of indigenous peoples and communities, UN doc. E/CN.4/2003/90, http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/IPeoples/SRIndigenousPeoples/Pages/AnnualReports.aspx

*Information received from Governments: Russian Federation: report on the international workshop on perspectives of relationships between indigenous peoples and industrial companies, held in Salekhard, Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Russian Federation , UN doc. E/C.19/2008/5/Add.6, http://daccess-ods.un.org/TMP/454702.079296112.html

 

Session 22, November 23rd

-Conflict and peace: unreported struggles

            Victoria Tauli-Corpuz and Joji Carino eds., Reclaiming Balance: Indigenous Peoples, Conflict Resolution and Sustainable Development,  Tebtebba and Third World Network, Baguio City, Philippines, 2004, pp 535-572

            Kay Warren, Indigenous Movements and Their Critics: Pan-Maya Activism in Guatemala, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1998, pp 86-112, 211-214

Center for Legal Action in Human Rights (CALDH), “ Guatemala: Today for the First Time in 500 Years We Have the Opportunity to Put Perpetrators of Genocide on Trial”, in Wilton Littlechild and Elsa Stamatopoulou eds. Indigenous Peoples’ Access to Justice, Including Truth and Reconciliation Processes , Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University, 2014 pp. 349-369

                        Chandra Roy , Victoria Tauli-Corpuz  and Amanda Romero-Medina eds., Beyond the Silencing of the Guns, Tebtebba, Baguio City, Philippines, 2004, pp 1-24, 78-105

*Jenny Ritchie, Colleen Lockie and Cheryl Rau “He Tatau Pounamu. Considerations for an early childhood peace curriculumn focusing on criticality, indigeneity, and an ethic of care, in Aotearoa New Zealand”. Journal Of Peace Education, (2011) Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 333-352

PART V            THE RETURN OF THE INTERNATIONAL TO THE LOCAL

Session 23, November 25th

- Indigenous Peoples in Russia

International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) Indigenous World 2015, http://www.iwgia.org/publications/search-pubs?publication_id=716

Lennard Sillanpaa, Awakening Siberia: From Marginalization to Self-Determination: The Small Indigenous Nations of Northern Russia on the Eve of the Millennium, Acta Politica No. 33, Helsinki, Department of Political Science, University of Helsinki, 2008, pp 15-62

            UNPFII eighth session report, UN doc. E/2009/43, paras. 9-27, see website of the Secretariat of the UNPFII, www.un.org/indigenous

            Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of indigenous peoples in the Russian Federation, UN doc. A/HRC/15/37/Add.5, http://daccess-ods.un.org/TMP/8451563.71593475.html

*Peruse website of RAIPON, www.raipon.info

 

Session 24, November 30th

-UN system policies and operations for Indigenous Peoples rights: are the UN and governments walking the talk?

            Elsa Stamatopoulou, “Walking the Talk? Including Indigenous Peoples’ Issues in Intergovernmental Organizations”, in Indigenous Peoples’ Rights in International Law,pp172-199, R.Dunbar-Ortiz, D. Sambo Dorough, G. Alfredson, L. Swepston and P. Wille co-editors, GALDU (Resource Centre for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) and IWGIA (International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs), Kautokeino and Copenhagen, 2015

UN Development Group (UNDG) Guidelines on Indigenous Peoples’ Issues, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/UNDG_Guidelines_indigenous_FINAL.pdf

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Indigenous Women and the United Nations System: Good Practices and Lessons Learned, New York, 2007, Sales No. E.06.1.9, pp 77-113 (see website of the Secretariat of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, www.un.org/indigenous, click on “Library and resources” on the left and scroll down).

Chandra Roy, “Indigenous Peoples in Asia: Rights and Development Challenges” in Making the Declaration Work (see above), pp 216-231

Regina Cortina , Ed, The Education of Indigenous Citizens in Latin America, 2014,Multilingual Matters, Bristol/Buffalo/Toronto,  pp. 1-18, 50-72

 

Session 25, December 2nd

-The case of Greenland: self-determination and devolution of power

                        Jens Boel and Soren T Thuesen, “Greenland and the World: The Impact of WWII on Danish-Greenlandic Relations, pp 9-35, in Cultural and Social Research in Greenland: Selected Essays 1992-2010, Nuuk, Ilisimatusafik/Forlaget Atuagkat, 2010.

International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) Indigenous World 2015,         http://www.iwgia.org/publications/search-pubs?publication_id=716, see re Greenland

            Henrietta Rasmusen, “Cultural Rights in Greenland” in Making the Declaration Work (see above), pp 232-247

            Kuupik Kleist, Premier of Greenland “Statement at the 2nd Session of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Geneva, 10-14 August 2009” in Making the Declaration Work (see above), pp248-251

            Government of Denmark, report to the UN Permanent Forum 2009 on self-determination of Greenland, E/C.19/2009/4/Add.4 (see www.un.org/indigenous, specifically  http://undesadspd.org/IndigenousPeoples/UNPFIISessions/Eight.aspx and scroll down to find the report)

*Tebtebba Foundation (Indigenous Peoples’ International Centre for Policy Research and Education), Indicators Relevant for Indigenous Peoples: A Resource Book, Baguio City, Philippines, 2008, pp 37-61, 273-293

 

Session 26, December 7th

-The case of Bolivia: from Indigenous Peoples’ exclusion to the creation of the Plurinational State of Bolivia and its international impact

International Work Group on Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) Indigenous World 2015, http://www.iwgia.org/publications/search-pubs?publication_id=716,  see re Bolivia

            Report of Bolivia to the UNPFII at its ninth session, UN doc. E/C.19/2010/12/Add.1, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/E.C.19.2010.12%201%20EN.pdf

Recommendations of the UNPFII to the Plurinational State of Bolivia, report of the UNPFII at its ninth session, UN doc. E/2010/43, paras. 54-70, see 9th session report of the UNPFII in www.un.org/indigenous

*Government of the Plurinational State of Bolivia: Vivir Bien: Mensajes y documentos sobre Vivir Bien 1995-2010, Diplomacia por la Vida no.3, pp9-10, 191-218

            *International Labour Organisation (ILO), Indigenous Peoples and MDGs: Perspectives from Communities in Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Guatemala and Nepal, November 2006, pp 5-19, 27-35

 

Session 27, December 9th

-Urban Indigenous Peoples: contemporary challenges from a human rights perspective

            UNPFII report of the International Expert Meeting on Urban Indigenous Peoples and Migration, UN doc. E/C.19/2007/CRP.8, www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/6session_crp8_en.doc

UNPFII report at its 6th session, UN doc. E/2007/43, paras. 107-118, see 6th session report in www.un.org/indigenous

State of the World’s Indigenous Peoples (see above under session 2), Chapter VII

Michael Kearney,“Transnational Oaxacan indigenous identity: The Case of Mixtecs and Zapotecs”, in Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, 7:2, 173-195,  2000

           Peruse the website of the American Indian Community House in NYC,  http://www.aich.org/

 

Session 28, December 14th

 -Concluding discussion

Wilton Littlechild, “When Indigenous Peoples Win, the Whole World Wins” in Making the Declaration Work (see above), pp 372-375.

 

 

[1] Material in languages other than English is optional

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